Meredith L. Gore

Conservation criminology

Interdisciplinary scholarship on natural resources, risk, and criminology

Some Background

In very recent years, the levels of unsustainable and illegal natural resource exploitation have escalated in scope, scale, and severity such that the issue is now firmly in the crosshairs of a huge diversity of high level policy actors. Today, a wide array of government, civil society, nongovernmental and private sector partners are collaborating and coordinating to address a problem that has wide-ranging impacts on society. One need only to consider recent documents or declarations from the US Executive Office, United Nations, or Prince of Wales to see that what was once considered a boutique issue squarely within the purview of the conservation community is now considered a global scourge on a swath of sectors. Repeatedly, calls are being made for holistic approaches to create a comprehensive picture of the problem that can in turn inform on-the-ground programs and high-level policies. For example KENYA. Decision makers are not clear about what data is needed, available and attainable to inform solutions to these problems because of their complexity. There is widespread agreement, however, that the convergence of threats—to ecosystems, geopolitical stability, national security, human health and well-being, or future generations---requires multidisciplinary and multidimensional approaches to resolve negative effects. Getting ahead of the problem requires holistic, integrative, and innovative perspectives. This is because the problem involves inherent complexities in both natural and societal domains.

Conservation criminology is one such paradigm. Comprised of three disciplinary pillars, the nascent idea of conservation criminology seeks to overcome the limitations of single-shot approaches and provide practical guidance about the situation on the ground. It is not a rigid, prescriptive dogma. Rather, it is a lens of sorts that different stakeholders can use, as needed, to view the environment and people that interact with it. As an interdisciplinary paradigm, the fundamental goal of conservation criminology is to provide a format for conversations and connections that lead to new knowledge. The paradigm is based on the principle of holism—the whole is not only greater than the sum of the parts but the parts are related in such a way that their functioning is conditioned by their relationship to each other.

Conservation Criminology Research
Conservation Criminology Research
Conservation Criminology Teaching
Conservation Criminology Teaching
Conservation Crimionlogy Policy & Practice
Conservation Crimionlogy Policy & Practice
Conservation Criminology News
Conservation Criminology News

About Me

I am a conservation social scientist working to explore relationships between human behavior and the environment.
I explore risk concepts and their application to biodiversity conservation.

I received my PhD in Natural Resource Policy and Management from Cornell University, MA in Environment and Resource Policy from George Washington University, and BA in Anthropology and Environmental Studies from Brandeis University. Along with others at MSU, I co-developed the Conservation Criminology research framework and teaching certificate program at MSU; the interdisciplinary approach synthesizes natural resource policy, risk and decision analysis, and crime science. My leadership in this field has resulted in new scientific insight regarding conservation of species such as white sharks, lemurs, cranes, sea turtles, rhinos, elephants, ploughshare tortoises, double-crested cormorants, black bears and gray wolves.

  • Department of Fisheries & Wildlife

    My tenure home is in MSU's College of Agriculture & Natural Resources

  • School of Criminal justice

    I am jointly appointed in MSU's College of Social Science

  • AgBioResearch

    My research maintains direct connections to issues that matter to Michigan

News

Gore lab members

Students in my lab work around the world on applied & interdisciplinary social science research.
Jessica Kahler
Jessica Kahler
PhD Candidate
Mark Gibson
Mark Gibson
PhD Student
RAchel Boratto
RAchel Boratto
PhD Student
Ronak Sripal
Ronak Sripal
PhD Student
Ethan Shirley
Ethan Shirley
JD/MS Student

Contact

Email is best

News

News from and about Gore Lab members.